Chancellor Fariña Kicks Off Applications for Community and Citywide Education Council Seats

  • Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2017 Updated: Thu Apr 19, 2018

Community and Citywide Education Councils. Strengthen Relationships between Schools and Communities. 325 Elected Seats on 36 Community and Citywide Education Councils Open to All Eligible Parents, Including Limited English Speakers. Increased Interpretation and Translation Services are Available to All CECs

NEW YORK – Chancellor Carmen Fariña today announced that parents interested in running for a Community or Citywide Education Council can apply through March 5. New York City public school parents with children currently enrolled in kindergarten through 8th grade can run for a Community Education Council. Parents with a high school student can apply for the Citywide Council on High Schools. To run for the other three Citywide Councils (D75, English Language Learners and Special Education), a parent must have a student receiving the respective services or programs. Parents interested in becoming members of a Community or Citywide Education Council should visit the NYC Parent Leaders website to apply. Parents can also text RUN2017 to 877-877 to receive an Elections Guide and ongoing updates. 

“I encourage every parent to get more involved in their child’s education and run for a Community or Citywide Education Council,” said Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña. “Education Councils play a critical role in their school communities, impacting the lives of their child and thousands more. During the last CEC election in 2015we saw a big spike in the number of parents who ran for a seat, and I know we will continue to see that enthusiasm and commitment to public education. Every parent- regardless of the language they speak or immigration status—should run and make a real difference in our public schools.”

The DOE will host information sessions, including a citywide session at Tweed Courthouse on February 13 at 6 p.m., for parents to learn about the roles and responsibilities of the Education Councils.  A number of the forums will be held in collaboration with the borough presidents’ offices. Beginning March 20, each district will host a forum for candidates to introduce themselves to their community and voters. Between April 23 and May 9, three officers of each school’s parent or parent-teacher association will cast their ballots online. On May 15, the results will be posted at the NYC Parent Leaders website. The newly elected Education Council members will attend trainings organized by the Division of Family and Community Engagement to learn about their roles and responsibilities, and will take office on July 1.

The 32 CECs are responsible for approving school zoning lines, holding hearings on the capital plan, and providing input on instructional and policy issues. The four Citywide Councils advise on policies affecting the students they represent. In addition, each Borough President appoints two members to each Community Education Council. The Public Advocate appoints members to the citywide councils. Elected and appointed members serve two year terms.

Interpretation services are also available at meetings. The DOE continues to expand language access, including more translation and interpretation services for Community and Citywide Education Councils. Immigration status is never a consideration for an Education Council position.

“Parents are our valued partners in education and the Community and Citywide Education Council elections allow families to serve as agents of change in their communities, bringing grassroots organizing to the fold and supporting challenges that school communities may face,” said Yolanda Torres Executive Superintendent of the Division of Family and Community Engagement. “We are working with community organizations, advocates, superintendent offices and schools to ensure we reach every parent interested in running for a seat. I encourage all parents to apply today.”

“As parents, our voice matters and serving on an Education Council is one of the most effective ways to be heard, to be visible and instrumental in your community’s decision making process on education policy,” said Hakiem Yahmadi, President of CEC 7. “I encourage parents to run for a seat, strengthening our City’s schools.” 

“CECs offer a unique opportunity for individuals to get involved in education on another level; working closely with district leadership, principals, teachers and parents to help make excellent schools in their communities,” said David Goldsmith, President, CEC 13. “Eligible parents should consider running for a Community or Citywide Education Council seat and become an integral part of what makes for a great public school system.” 

The 2015 Raise Your Hand campaign saw a significant increase in participation with 1,290 parents applying for Community and Citywide Education Councils, up from 729 in 2013 and 511 in 2011. This year, the DOE is committed to expanding its efforts further with the Raise Your Hand campaign. The robust, multi-language marketing campaign will reach families in subway cars, bus shelters, taxis and schools, as well as through robo calls, text messages, and digital and print media ads.

The Council

Community Education Councils (CECs)
The CECs work closely with the district superintendents, approve school zoning lines, hold hearings on the capital plan, and provide input on policy issues. Each CEC has nine elected members who are parents of students in grades K-8 in district schools, and two Borough President appointees.

Citywide Council on High Schools (CCHS)
The CCHS advises on education policy and issues involving high school students. The CCHS has 10 elected members, two from each borough, who must be parents of students currently attending a public high school. Three members are appointed.

Citywide Council on English Language Learners (CCELL)
The CCELL advises on education policy and issues involving students in bilingual or English as a New Language (ENL) programs. The CCELL has nine elected members, who must be parents of students currently or recently classified by the DOE as English Language Learners. Two members are appointed by the Public Advocate.

Citywide Council on Special Education (CCSE)
The CCSE advises on education policy and services for students with disabilities. The CCSE has nine elected members, who must be parents of students receiving special education services paid for by the DOE. Two members are appointed by the Public Advocate.

Citywide Council for District 75 (CCD75)
The CCD75 advises on education policy and services for students with disabilities who attend a D75 program. The CCD75 has nine elected members, who must be parents of students in a D75 program. Two members are appointed by the Public Advocate.

For more information about elected and appointed members, visit nycparentleaders.org. Parents can also text RUN2017 to 877-877 to receive an Elections Guide and updates (charges may apply).

Important Dates

February 9 - March 5 – Parents interested in running for a seat on a Council submit an application online (computers will be available at schools and libraries). 

March 20 - April 21 – Presidents’ Councils, along with the DOE, host forums for parents to meet and ask questions of Council candidates.

April 23 - May 9 – Presidents, Treasurers, and Recording Secretaries of Parent Associations and Parent-Teacher Associations vote for the new Community and Citywide Education Council Members for the 2017-2019 term.

May 15 – The results are published on the NYC Parent Leaders website.

July 1– Elected and appointed Community and Citywide Education Council Members for the 2017-2019 term take office.

The following borough-based information sessions are scheduled (or have been held). Each will begin at 6:00pm.

Citywide:

February 13
Tweed Courthouse
52 Chambers Street 

Bronx:

February 16
Bronx Borough Hall, Room 915
851 Grand Concourse 

Manhattan:

February 22
The Municipal Building
1 Centre Street, 19th floor South

Brooklyn:

February 7
Brooklyn Borough Hall
209 Joralemon St. 

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