NYC Reads 365

NYC Reads 365 is a citywide program aimed at encouraging kids to read for fun by helping them find interesting high quality books for independent reading.

The centerpiece of NYC Reads 365 is a collection of reading lists for each grade level, curated by expert school librarians. Each reading list includes 20 books in a wide range of genres, formats, styles, and subject matter, and, is updated annually.

Do you have a child who loves sports? Mysteries? Graphic novels? Computer programming? Romance? Wacky humor? Tear jerkers? American history? Cute cats? Zombies?

You can find books for all these interests — and many, many more — on the NYC Reads 365 reading lists.

You may see posters in your schools or school libraries promoting these collections. If you would like to find the lists in one handy place, you can download bookmarks for each grade level here. You can also view the full reading lists, along with a host of useful resources, with through the NYC Reads 365 Resources in the related links section of this page.

Learn about new books, find out how you can support your child in becoming an engaged and lifelong reader, and help your child find a great book to read. Together, we are making New York City a community of readers — 365 days a year!

At Home Activities: Grades Pre-K–2

Model Positive Reading Habits

  • Let your children see you read for pleasure.
  • Share your excitement for reading with your kids. Talk about what you are reading and why you are reading it.
  • Give books as presents for holidays or as rewards for special accomplishments.
  • Make reading part of regular family activities
  • Schedule time into your daily/weekly schedule for the whole family to sit down and read.
  • Take a trip to the local bookstore, or an online bookstore, and shop for books as a family.
  • Visit the library as a family; help each other select books to read.
  • Attend readings by favorite authors at local bookstores and libraries. If possible, purchase the book and let your child get the author's signature.
  • Encourage older children to read to younger children (siblings, cousins, neighbors, and even stuffed animals make great audience members).

Read Aloud to Each Other

  • Read your child's favorite stories aloud to him/her.
  • Let your child read aloud to you. Reading the same book multiple times is natural and beneficial for new readers. You might also want to try reading a page to your child then ask your child to read the same page back to you. Keep it fun or make it into a game.
  • Practice the names of letters and the sounds the letters make. “Do you see the letter 'b' on the page? What sound does that letter make?”
  • Practice the sounds in words with your child. Young children often do not hear all the sounds that make up words. Use rhyming words: cat-> hat -> mat -> bat. Sound words out with your child: “Where's your book? B-b-b--oooo-k.”

Create a Reading Environment in Your Home

  • Set up a comfortable space in your home for reading, free from distractions like TV/computer/games/phones. Placing pillows or cushions on the floor is an easy way to make your regular space into a reading space.
  • Have reading materials throughout your home and easily accessible to your children.
  • Leave notes for your child in his/her lunch box or school bag, or around the house.
  • Always bring a book to read on public transportation and when you anticipate having to wait in a line (like at the doctor's office).
  • Create a special place for your children to keep their books in the home (a specific section of a bookshelf, a box in their room, etc.)

Talk about Books

  1. At dinner, or other informal times, ask your children about the book they are reading.
  2. Use reading questions to have deeper conversations about books.
  3. Share your childhood memories about reading and books. Talk about your own favorite kid's books and authors, your struggles/successes with reading, etc.

Provide Books Aligned to Your Child's Interests

  1. Notice what your child is most interested in reading and provide them with more reading materials on that topic/genre.
  2. Encourage relatives to give books as gifts. Suggest topics in which your child is interested.
  3. Ask a teacher or librarian for book suggestions —they usually know the new and popular reading material for children of different ages.

If Needed, Provide Some Incentives for Reading

  1. Allow kids to stay up past their bedtime (10-15 minutes) to finish reading a book or chapter. • Allow kids to watch additional minutes of television in return for reading at home.
  2. Keep a list or chart of the books read, set a goal, and determine a special reward for meeting that goal.     

Pre-K Reading List

  • (Vehicles) Go (series) by Steve Light
  • 1 Big Salad: a Delicious Counting Book by Juana Medina
  • Among a Thousand Fireflies by Helen Frost, illustrated by Rick Leider
  • Apples and Robins by Lucie Félix
  • Because of an Acorn by Lola Shaefer and Adam Shaefer, illustrated by Frann Preston-Gannon
  • Cat Nap by Toni Yuly
  • Every Day Birds by Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, illustrated by Dylan Metrano
  • Finding Spring by Carin Berger
  • First Snow by Peter McCarty
  • Float by Daniel Miyares
  • If I Had a Triceratops by George O'Connor
  • Lizard from the Park by Mark Pett
  • Marta! Big and Small by Jan Arena, illustrated by Angela Dominguez
  • Raindrops Roll by April Pulley Sayre
  • Shark Detective! by Jessica Olien
  • Splat the Cat (series) by Rob Scotton
  • Stanley (series) William Bee
  • The Bear Ate Your Sandwich Julia Sarcone-Roach
  • Two Mice by Sergio Ruzzier
  • Who Done It? by Olivier Tallec

Kindergarten Reading List

  • "Oh, No," Said Elephant by A. H. Benjamin
  • Bad Kitty (series) by Nick Bruehl
  • Bunny Slopes by Claudia Rueda
  • Egg: Nature's Perfect Package by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page
  • Extremely Cute Animals Operating Heavy Machinery by David Gordon
  • I Hear a Pickle: and Smell, See, Touch, & Taste It, Too! by Rachel Isadora
  • Knit Together by Angela Dominguez
  • Little Tree by Loren Long
  • Market Maze by Roxie Munro
  • Max at Night (series) by Ed Vere
  • Monster Trouble! by Lane Fredrickson, illustrated by Michael Robertson
  • More-igami by Dori Kleber, illustrated by G. Brian Karas
  • Ordinary People Change the World (series) by Brad Meltzer, illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos
  • Over the Ocean by Taro Gomi
  • Plants Can't Sit Still by Rebecca E. Hirsch, illustrated by Mia Posada
  • Stella Brings the Family by Miriam B Schiffer, illustrated by Holly Clifton-Brown
  • The Summer Nick Taught His Cats to Read by Curtis Manley, illustrated by Kate Berube
  • This Is My Book! by Mark Pett
  • Traveling Butterflies by Susumu Shingu
  • When Green Becomes Tomatoes: Poems for All Seasons by Julie Fogliano, illustrated by Julie Morstad

Grade One Reading List

  • A Rock Can Be by Laura Purdie Salas
  • Ballet Cat (series) by Bob Shea
  • Before Morning by Joyce Sidman, illustrated by Beth Krommes
  • Can I Eat That? by Joshua David Stein, illustrated by Julia Rothman
  • City Shapes by Diana Murray, illustrated by Bryan Collier
  • Grandma in Blue with Red Hat by Scott Menchin, illustrated by Harry Bliss
  • Imani's Moon by Janay Brown-Wood, illustrated by Hazel Mitchell
  • Leo: a Ghost Story by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Christian Robinson
  • Night Animals by Gianna Marino
  • Noodleheads See the Future by Tedd Arnold, Martha Hamilton, and Mitch Weiss
  • Pig in a Wig (series) by Emma Virján
  • Snail and Worm: Three Stories About Two Friends by Tina Kügler
  • The Airport Book by Lisa Brown
  • The Good for Nothing Button (series) by Charise Mericle Harper and Mo Willems
  • The Lost House by B. B.Cronin
  • Their Great Gift by John Coy, illustrated by Wing Young Huie
  • Thunder Boy Jr. by Sherman Alexie, illustrated by Yuyi Morales
  • Tiny Creatures: The World of Microbes by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Emily Sutton
  • Water is Water: A Book About the Water Cycle Miranda Paul, illustrated by Jason Chin
  • When Otis Courted Mama by Kathi Appelt, illustrated by Jill McElmurry

Grade Two Reading List

  • Anything But Ordinary Addie: The True Story of Adelaide Hermann, Queen of Magic by Mara Rockliff, illustrated by Iacopo Bruno
  • Are We There Yet? by Dan Santat
  • Arthur and the Golden Rope: Brownstone's Mythical Collection by Joe Todd-Stanton
  • Buddy and Earl (series) by Maureen Fergus, illustrated by Carey Sookocheff
  • Comics Squad: Recess, edited by Jarrett Krosoczka, Jennifer L. Holm, and Matthew Holm
  • Emmanuel's Dream: the True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah by Laurie Ann Thompson, illustrated by Sean Qualls
  • I (Don't) Like Snakes by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Luciano Lozano
  • Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure by Nadja Spiegelman, illustrated by Sergio García Sánchez
  • Masterpiece Adventures (series) by Elise Broach, illustrated by Kelly Murphy
  • Narwhal: Unicorn of the Sea (series) by Ben Clanton
  • Nerdy Birdy by Aaron Reynolds, illustrated by Matt Davies
  • One Plastic Bag by Miranda Paul illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon
  • Rabbi Benjamin's Buttons by Alice B. McGinty, illustrated by Jennifer Black Reinhardt
  • Rivers of Sunlight: How the Sun Moves Water Around the Earth by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm
  • Tales of Bunjitsu Bunny by John Himmelman
  • The Journey by Francesca Sanna
  • The Princess in Black by Shannon Hale and Dean Hale, illustrated by LeUyen Pham
  • The Real Poop on Pigeons by Kevin McCloskey
  • The Secret Subway by Shana Corey, illustrated by Red Nose Studio
  • Written and Drawn by Henrietta by Liniers

At Home Activities: Grades 3–5

Model Positive Reading Habits

  1. Let your children see you read for pleasure.
  2. Share your excitement for reading with your kids. Talk about what you are reading and why you are reading it.
  3. Give books as presents for holidays or as rewards for special accomplishments.

Make Reading Part of Regular Family Activities

  1. Schedule time into your daily/weekly schedule for the whole family to sit down and read.
  2. Take a trip to the local bookstore, or an online bookstore, and shop for books as a family.
  3. Visit the library as a family; help each other select books to read.
  4. Attend readings by favorite authors at local bookstores and libraries. If possible, purchase the book and let your child get the author's signature.
  5. Encourage older children to read to younger children (siblings, cousins, neighbors, and even stuffed animals make great audience members).

Read Aloud to Each Other

  • Read your child's favorite stories aloud to him/her.
  • Let your child read aloud to you. If his/her reading sounds choppy, practice the page several times. Alternatively, you read the page first, and then ask your child to read the same page back to you. Keep it fun or make it into a game.
  • Find materials to read aloud wherever you go: menus, advertisements, brochures, free papers etc.

Create a Reading Environment in Your Home

  • Set up a comfortable space in your home for reading, free from distractions like TV/computer/games/phones. Placing pillows or cushions on the floor is an easy way to make your regular space into a reading space.
  • Have reading materials (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.) throughout your home and easily accessible to your children
  • Subscribe to a children's magazine and have the magazine sent directly to your child. Show interest when it arrives: for example, “Show me your favorite article,” “I love that picture of the sea lions.” Some popular magazines include Highlights, Click, Ranger Rick, Sports Illustrated for Kids, National Geographic Junior, Teen People, and J-14.
  • Use reading as a vehicle for learning. If your child is interested in flying a kite, read an article on making a kite at home.
  • Leave notes for your child in his/her lunch box or school bag, or around the house. There is no more purposeful reading for children than to read something written especially for them!
  • Ask relatives and friends that do not live near you to send letters or emails to your child.
  • Always bring a book to read on public transportation and when you anticipate having to wait in a line (like at the doctor's office).
  • When traveling, buy bookmarks as souvenirs (they are inexpensive and promote reading!)
  • Create a special place for your children to keep their books in the home (a specific section of a bookshelf, a box in their room, etc.).

Talk about Books

  1. At dinner, or other informal times, ask your children about the book they are reading.
  2. Use reading questions to have deeper conversations about books.
  3. Share your childhood memories about reading and books. Talk about your own favorite kid's books and authors, your struggles/successes with reading, etc.

Provide Books Aligned to Your Child's Interests

  1. Notice what your child is most interested in reading and provide them with more reading materials on that topic/genre.
  2. Encourage relatives to give books as gifts. Suggest topics in which your child is interested.
  3. Ask a teacher or librarian for book suggestions—they usually know the new and popular reading material for children of different ages.

If Needed, Provide Some Incentives for Reading

  1. Allow kids to stay up past their bedtime (10-15 minutes) to finish reading a book or chapter. • Allow kids to watch additional minutes of television in return for reading at home.
  2. Keep a list or chart of the books read, set a goal, and determine a special reward for meeting that goal.     

Grade Three Reading List

  • Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate
  • Earmuffs for Everyone: How Chester Greenwood Became Known as the Inventor of Earmuffs by Meghan McCarthy
  • EllRay Jakes by Sally Warner, illustrated by Brian Biggs
  • Feathers: Not Just for Flying by Melissa Stewart, illustrated by Sarah S. Brannen
  • Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by E. G. Campbell
  • Flutter & Hum: Animal Poems/Aleto y Zumbido: Poemas de Animales by Julie Paschkis
  • Freedom in Congo Square by Carole Boston Weatherford, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie
  • How to Swallow a Pig: Step-by-Step Advice From the Animal Kingdom by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page
  • I, Fly: The Buzz About Flies and How Awesome They Are by Bridget Heos
  • Inspector Flytrap by Tom Angleberger, illustrated by Cece Bell
  • Lulu (series) by Hilary McKay, illustrated by Priscilla Lamont
  • My Pet Human by Yasmine Surovec
  • On A Beam Of Light: A Story of Albert Einstein by Jennifer Berne
  • Rabbit and Robot and Ribbit by Cece Bell
  • Sidewalk Flowers JonArno Lawson, illustrated by Sydney Smith
  • Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos by Stephanie Roth Sisson
  • Stick Dog by Tom Watson, illustrated by Ethan Long
  • The Lunch Witch by Deb Lucke
  • Toilet: How It Works by David Macaulay and Sheila Keenan
  • Winter Bees & Other Poems of the Cold by Joyce Sidman, illustrated by Rick Allen

Grade Four Reading List

  • 28 Days: Moments in Black history That Changed the World by Charles R. Smith Jr., illustrated by Shane W. Williams
  • A Handful of Stars by Cynthia Lord
  • Alvin Ho (series) by Lenore Look, illustrated by LeUyen Pham
  • Firefly Hollow by Alison McGhee, illustrated by Christopher Denise
  • Fright-lopedia: An Encyclopedia of Everything Scary, Creepy, and Spine-chilling, from Arachnids to Zombies by Jill Winterbottom, illustrated by Stefano Tambellini
  • Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras by Duncan Tonatiuh
  • Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph by Roxane Orgill, illustrated by Francis Vallejo
  • Malala: A Brave Girl from Pakistan/Iqbal, A Brave Boy from Pakistan by Jeanette Winter
  • Ophelia and the Marvelous Boy by Karen Foxlee, illustrated by Yoko Tanaka
  • Rising Above: How 11 Athletes Overcame Challenges in Their Youth to Become Stars by Gregory Zuckerman
  • Sasquatch and Aliens (series) by Charise Mericle Harper
  • Stormstruck! by John Macfarlane
  • The Boy Who Fell Off the Mayflower or John Howland's Good Fortune by P.J. Lynch
  • The Human Body by Ken Jennings, illustrated by Mike Lowry
  • The Jumbies by Tracey Baptiste
  • The Last Kids on Earth (series) by Max Brallier, illustrated by Douglas Hollgate
  • The Tragic Tale of the Great Auk by Jan Thornhill
  • The Wild Robot by Peter Brown
  • Two Naomis by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich and Audrey Vernick
  • Untamed: The Wild Life of Jane Goodall by Anita Silvey

Grade 5 Reading List

  • As Brave As You by Jason Reynolds
  • Dara Palmer's Major Drama by Emma Shevah
  • El Deafo by Cece Bell
  • George by Alex Gino
  • Half-Truths and Brazen Lies: An Honest Look at Lying by Kira Vermond, illustrated by Clayton Hanmer
  • House Arrest by K. A. Holt
  • Human Body Theater by Maris Wicks
  • I Survived True Stories (series) by Lauren Tarshis
  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell, illustrated by Christian Robinson 
  • Mesmerized: How Benjamin Franklin Solved a Mystery that Baffled All of France by Mara Rockliff, illustrated by Iacopo Bruno
  • Monster Science: Could Monsters Survive (and Thrive!) in the Real World? by Helaine Becker, illustrated by Phil McAndrew
  • Rip and Red (series) by Phil Bildner, illustrated by Tim Probert
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family's Fight for Desegregation by Duncan Tonatiuh
  • Stella by Starlight by Sharon M. Draper
  • The Doldrums by Nicholas Gannon
  • The Fourteenth Goldfish by Jennifer L. Holm
  • The Honest Truth by Dan Gemeinhart
  • The Island of Beyond by Elizabeth Atkinson
  • Towers Falling by Jewell Parker Rhodes
  • Twerp by Mark Goldblatt

At Home Activities: Grades 6–8

Model Positive Reading Habits

  1. Let your children see you read for pleasure.
  2. Share your excitement for reading with your kids. Talk about what you are reading and why you are reading it.
  3. Give books as presents for holidays or as rewards for special accomplishments.

Make Reading Part of Regular Family Activities

  1. Schedule time into your daily/weekly schedule for the whole family to sit down and read.
  2. Take a trip to the local bookstore, or an online bookstore, and shop for books as a family.
  3. Visit the library as a family; help each other select books to read.
  4. Attend readings by favorite authors at local bookstores and libraries. If possible, purchase the book and let your child get the author's signature.
  5. Encourage older children to read to younger children (siblings, cousins, neighbors, etc.).

Read Aloud to Each Other

  1. Ask your child to read his/her book aloud to you. If they seem resistant, ask them to read a smaller section such as a paragraph, or page from their book.
  2. Read aloud interesting articles from newspapers, magazines, or online sites. “Listen to this, the mayor thinks we should..."
  3. Incorporate these read-alouds into your daily/weekly routines: while doing the dishes, making food, etc.
  4. Read aloud an instruction manual, or ask your child to read it aloud to you, as you put together a new item in your home.

Create a Reading Environment in Your Home

  • Set up a comfortable space in your home for reading, free from distractions like TV/computer/games/phones. Placing pillows or cushions on the floor is an easy way to make your regular space into a reading space.
  • Have reading materials (books, magazines, newspapers, etc.) throughout your home and easily accessible to your children.
  • Subscribe to a magazine and have the magazine sent directly to your child.
  • Use reading as a vehicle for learning. Research and read about topics that come up naturally in conversation. (“I wonder when the subway was built—let's look it up.")
  • Ask relatives and friends that do not live near you to send letters or emails to your child.
  • Remind your child to bring a book on public transportation and when they anticipate having to wait in a line (like at the doctor's office).
  • When traveling, buy bookmarks as souvenirs (they are inexpensive and promote reading!)

Talk about Books

  • At dinner, or other informal times, ask your children about the book they are reading.
  • Use reading questions to have deeper conversations about books.
  • Share your childhood memories about reading and books. Talk about your own favorite books and authors from middle school, your struggles/successes with reading, etc.

Provide Books Aligned to Your Child's Interests

  1. Notice what your child is most interested in reading and provide them with more reading materials on that topic/genre.
  2. Encourage relatives to give books as gifts. Suggest topics in which your child is interested.
  3. Ask a teacher or librarian for book suggestions —they usually know the new and popular reading material for children of different ages.

Help Adolescents Balance Reading with Their Active Social Lives:

  1. Set aside a span of time every night that is just for reading (turn the phone and TV off).
  2. Make a schedule with your child to help plan out reading (the bus ride on the way to karate lessons is a great time for reading).
  3. Buy a couple copies of a book and encourage your child to invite his/her best friend to read it together.

Grade Six Reading List

  • Awkward by Svetlana Chmakova
  • Blackbird Fly by Erin Entrada Kelly
  • Charlie Joe Jackson's Guide to... (series) by Tommy Greenwald, illustrated by J. P. Coovert
  • Courage and Defiance: Stories of Spies, Saboteurs, and Survivors in World War II Denmark by Deborah Hopkinson
  • Drones by Louise Spilsbury
  • Jinx Trilogy (series) by Sage Blackwood
  • Let Your Voice Be Heard: The Life And Times Of Pete Seeger by Anita Silvey
  • Lost in the Pacific, 1942 by Tod Olson
  • Mad about Monkeys by Owen Davey
  • Maker Lab: 28 Super Cool Projects: Build * Invent * Create * Discover by Jack Challoner
  • Once Was A Time by Leila Sales
  • Planet Tad (series) by Tim Carvell
  • Sitting Bull : Lakota Warrior And Defender Of His People by S.D. Nelson
  • Sneaker Century: A History of Athletic Shoes by Amber Keyser
  • Stars of World Soccer by Illugi Jökulsson
  • The Boy Who Harnessed The Wind by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer
  • The Inker's Shadow by Allen Say
  • The Tapper Twins Tear Up New York by Geoff Rodkey
  • Tiny Stiches: The Life Of Medical Pioneer Vivien Thomas by Gwendolyn Hooks, illustrated by Colin Bootman
  • Took: A Ghost Story by Mary Downing Hahn

Grade 7–8 Reading List

  • Bubonic Panic: When Plague Invaded America by Gail Jarrow
  • Coding Projects in Scratch by Jon Woodcock
  • Compass South by Hope Larson, illustrated by Svetlana Chamakova
  • Embassy Row (series) by Ally Carter
  • Everland by Wendy Spinale
  • First Flight Around the World by Tim Grove
  • Flying Cars by Andrew Glass
  • Ghost by Jason Reynolds
  • Gracefully Grayson by Ami Polonsky
  • Lunar Chronicles (series) by Marissa Meyer
  • Ms. Marvel (series) by G. Willow Wilson, illustrated by Takeshi Miyazawa
  • Paper Things by Jennifer Richard Jacobson
  • Ruby on the Outside by Nora Raleigh Baskin
  • Steve Jobs: Insanely Great by Jessie Hartland
  • Survivor's Club by Michael Bornstein and Debbie Bornstein Holinstat
  • The Lions of Little Rock by Kristin Levine
  • The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights by Steve Sheinkin
  • The Rig by Joe Ducie
  • To All the Boys I've Loved Before by Jenny Han
  • Where You'll Find Me by Natasha Friend

At Home Activities: Grades 9–12

  1. Encourage teens to use various social media tools such as GoodReads, where they can connect with people who like the same books as them, and share their opinions about the books they are reading.
  2. Keep your discussions about reading positive; do not pressure your kids or criticize the books they like.
  3. Read some popular Young Adult books and discuss with your teen; this can be a wonderful way to talk about sensitive subjects.
  4. Graphic Novels
  5. Encourage your teen to become an expert in a subject they particularly enjoy, by reading widely and deeply about that topic.
  6. Do not abandon reading aloud just because your teens are capable of reading for themselves; reading aloud something you mutually enjoy can be a great bonding experience.
  7. Remind teens that used bookstores are great places to hunt for quirky, bargain books.
  8. Suggest to your teen that he/she leave online reviews about the books they have read, to help other readers decide whether or not those books might be right for them. They can leave reviews on Amazon, or start a "vlogging" book review series on YouTube.
  9. Listen to audio books. While it is not “reading,” it is a great way to get teens “hooked” on different literature and authors.
  10. Reading takes many forms. Reading blogs and other online material is valuable just like reading books. Encourage teens to get a blog reading app on their smartphone or subscribe to get their favorite blogs in their email inbox.
  11. Help teens find social events like poetry slams or teen book clubs at a local branch library, bookstore, or art space.
  12. Use various online tools such as Animoto to create their own book trailers

Grade 9–10 Reading List

  • All American Boys by Jason Reynolds
  • Ana of California by Andi Teran
  • Audacity by Melanie Crowder
  • Drowned City: Hurricane Katrina & New Orleans by Don Brown
  • Flawd by Emily-Anne Rigal
  • Genius (series) by Leopoldo Gout
  • Hamilton: The Revolution by Lin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter
  • Holding Up the Universe by Jennifer Niven
  • How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon
  • I am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World (Young Readers Edition) by Malala Yousafzai with Patricia McCormick
  • Nimona by Noelle Stevenson
  • Samurai Rising: The Epic Life of Minamoto Yoshitsune by Pamela S. Turner, illustrated by Gareth Hinds
  • Shadowshaper by Daniel José Older
  • Something In Between by Melissa de la Cruz
  • The Living (series) by Matt de la Peña
  • The Rest of Us Just Live Here by Patrick Ness
  • The Selection (series) by Kiera Cass
  • Untwine by Edwidge Danticat
  • We Should Hang Out Sometime: Embarrassingly, a True Story by Josh Sundquist
  • Why'd They Wear That?: Fashion as the Mirror of History by Sarah Albee

Grade 11–12 Reading List

  • Carry On by Rainbow Rowell
  • Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon
  • Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero
  • Ghetto Brother: Warrior to Peacemaker by Julian Voloj, illustrated by Claudia Ahlering
  • Harlem Hellfighters by Max Brooks, illustrated by Canaan White
  • Heartless by Marissa Meyer
  • IQ by Joe Ide
  • Many Faces of Josephine Baker: Dancer, Singer, Activist, Spy by Peggy Caravantes
  • Replica (series) by Lauren Oliver
  • Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
  • Six of Crows (series) by Leigh Bardugo
  • So You've Been Publicly Shamed by Jon Ronson
  • The Boy Meets Girl Massacre (Annotated) by Ainslie Hogarth
  • The Crash Detectives: Investigating the World's Most Mysterious Air Disasters by Christine Negroni
  • The Freedom Summer Murders by Don Mitchell
  • The Girl Who Escaped ISIS: This Is My Story by Farida Khalaf
  • The Star Side of Bird Hill by Naomi Jackson
  • This Book is Gay by Juno Dawson and Spike Gerrell
  • This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki, illustrated by Jillian Tamaki
  • Zeroes (series) by Scott Westerfeld, Margo Lanagan, and Deborah Biancotti

Acknowledgments

Professional Collaborations

A committee of School Library Media Specialist compiled the 11 reading lists consisting of 220 titles. New York City Department of Education literacy experts from the Office of Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Learning later reviewed them. They spent countless hours reading, writing summaries, and creating tools for how to use the lists.

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