NYC Middle School Admissions Guide

Welcome to middle school admissions! Here's how to get started:

  1. Sign up for the middle school email lists.
  2. Keep reading this page to learn how students get offers and what makes a strong middle school application.
  3. With MySchools, you can explore your middle school options, find choices for your application, and apply to middle school—all in one place. Be sure to meet with your school counselor to discuss your application choices.
  4. Visit schools and attend the middle school district fairs.
  5. Apply to middle school by December 2, 2019. Learn more below.

Who Can Apply?

To apply to middle school, your child must be both a New York City resident and either a current fifth grade student or a current sixth grade student at an elementary school that ends in sixth grade. Current fourth grade students who live or go to school in District 3 can apply to the Center School (03M243). Current fourth grade students who live or go to school in Queens can apply to Louis Armstrong Middle School (30Q227). Current sixth grade students can apply to Baccalaureate School for Global Education (30Q580). We serve and welcome all NYC students, including:

Multilingual/English Language Learners

All NYC public schools provide a range of supports and services for Multilingual/English Language Learners to develop their English language skills and prepare them for success in school, college, and careers. Learn more about English as a new language (ENL), transitional bilingual education (TBE), and dual language (DL) programs.

Students with Disabilities

Every middle school is expected to welcome and serve students with disabilities in accordance with the recommended programs and services on their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). All middle school programs admit general education students and students with disabilities. Testing accommodations are provided according to students’ IEPs or 504 plans. Students enrolled in District 75 who are considering a District 1-32 middle school can participate in middle school admissions.

Students with Accessibility Needs

The NYC Department of Education (DOE) is committed to providing students with accessibility needs an offer to a middle school program that allows them to access all relevant programs and services. For the most up-to-date information about accessibility, check our website and contact schools directly. In the MySchools Middle School Directory, you can filter for fully or partially accessible schools.

Students in Temporary Housing

Students in temporary housing enrolled in a DOE elementary school may apply to middle school programs, even if they move to a temporary residence outside of NYC. They are not required to submit documentation (including address, proof of age, and immunization) in order to participate in an admissions process and accept their offer.

Immigrant Families

Every child in New York City has a right to a public school education, regardless of immigration status. By law, children may not be asked to present documentation of immigration status, nor can they be denied admission, registration, or enrollment in school based on immigration status. DOE employees will not ask about a family’s status, and if they do learn about immigration status, they must keep it confidential. Public schools are at the center of our democracy and remain safe places for all students, families, and educators.

LGBTQ Students and Families

All of our schools welcome and support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning students, families, and staff. You can apply to a single-gender programs based on your gender identity, regardless of sex assigned at birth. If you have a transgender child who is interested in a single-gender school, ask their school counselor to assist in the application process. In MySchools, use the search term "GSA" for a list of schools with a club that supports LGBTQ students.

Know the Paths to Middle School

In October, access your child’s personalized middle school application and submit it online with MySchools, through their school counselor, or in person at a Family Welcome Center by Monday, December 2, 2019. From your child’s middle school options, you can add up to 12 programs to their application. In March, you will get your child’s middle school offer letter, which will include a middle school offer. If you choose not to submit a middle school application, you will get an offer to a middle school program with available seats.

Admissions for Current District 75 Students

District 75 provides highly specialized instructional support for students with significant challenges, such as Autism Spectrum Disorders, significant cognitive delays, emotional disturbances, sensory impairments, and multiple disabilities. These supports are offered in a wide variety of settings and locations across New York City, including special classes co-located in District 1-32 schools, school buildings where all students have IEPs, general education classrooms, agencies, hospitals, and at home.

The families of students with disabilities who are recommended for a District 75 program, but who are considering a middle school outside of District 75 should also work with their IEP team to determine whether the recommendation for a District 75 program for middle school is appropriate. If the IEP team, including the family, believe that a District 75 recommended program continues to be appropriate, the District 75 Placement Office will notify the student of their District 75 middle school program placement in May or June.

Charter Schools

  • Charter schools are free public schools that are open to all New York City students and that operate independently from the Department of Education (DOE). Instead, charter schools operate under a performance contract, or charter, issued by a New York State authorizer. They are accountable for meeting specific academic goals and often try different approaches to ensure their students meet these goals.
  • Please note that charter schools have a separate middle school application process. If you would like to apply to middle school at a charter school, please contact that school directly to learn about their enrollment and admissions. Note that some charter middle schools only admit students who attend school at one or more partner charter elementary schools. Any student eligible for admission to a DOE public school is eligible for admission to a public charter school.
  • For a list of charter middle schools by borough and their contact information, turn to the back of the print edition of the 2020 Middle School Admissions Guide. For more general information, please see the charter school web page or call 212-374-5419.

Explore Schools and Programs

As you start learning about your child’s middle school options, consider what matters most to your family. This might be location, language offerings, a sports team, or accessibility.

  • During the application period, find schools online in the MySchools Middle School Directory.
  • Your school counselor will help parents/guardians of fifth grade students - or of sixth grade students whose elementary schools end with sixth grader - to create a MySchools account and access your child's personalized search experience. Once your family has an account and is logged in, you can save favorite programs, get helpful tips, and start adding programs to your child's application.

Finding Schools of Interest

SEARCH

Type course names, interests, clubs, and programs into the search bar to find schools that offer what you're looking for:

  • For schools featuring specific courses or activities, type what you are looking for - such as STEM, Dance, or similar - into the search bar.
  • For schools with Dual Language programs, type Dual Language or a more specific search term like Spanish Dual Language.

Screen capture of the MySchools Search bar and filter options from the public High School Directory.

FILTER

Use filters to narrow your search to schools with specific features:

  • Use the Subway filter to find options along specific train lines.
  • Use the Size filter to search for schools by how many students go there.
  • Use the Sports filter to find schools that have teams for specific sports, such as basketball and swimming.
  • Select More Filters to see options to filter for schools...

Understanding School Information

When the application period opens, you can view schools’ more detailed pages in the MySchools Middle School Directory. The information in a MySchools page can help you learn if a school might be a good place for your child. Consider how a school’s offerings line up with your child’s interests and needs. Are the school’s classes and activities ones that your child enjoys, does well at, or would like to explore?

  • Use the school's location to plan what your child's daily commute would be like. Click the map or address to get directions. Click these symbols to zoom in (+) or out (-) of the map.
  • Use subway and bus information to find possible routes to the school.
  • Find a link to the school's website, and contact staff directly by phone or email to learn about open houses or ask questions.
  • Consider how factors like a school's grade span, size, and daily schedule might influence your child's daily learning experience.
  • Read the school's overview to learn about its vision and what makes it special, in the school's own words.
  • Click + Performance to find out about the school's performance. If you have questions about performance data, speak with your school counselor. You can also look up any school's School Quality Report by entering its name in Find a School. These reports include more detailed information on each school's performance. Additionally, the New York State Education Department determines school accountability based on its own set of measures.
  • Click + Academics to find out which academic programs and supports the school offers, including language courses.
  • Click + Activities to learn about the school's clubs, sports teams, and ensembles, as well as other activities.
  • Click + Accessibility or hover over the accessibility icon to find out if the school is fully accessible, partially accessible, or not accessible.

Note that all the information in a school listing or MySchools page may change for the 2020-2021 school year. Contact schools directly for the most up-to-date information.

Types of Programs

DISTRICT PROGRAMS

Eligibility: Open to students and residents of the district

Your child can apply to programs that are located in the district where your family is zoned for middle school, or the district where your child attends public elementary school. Sometimes families are zoned for middle school in a different district than where they are zoned for elementary school; in these cases, the middle school’s zone determines your child’s eligibility.

Some district programs may be open only to students who live or go to school in that district. If a program’s eligibility is “Open to students who live in the zone,” this means it’s open only to applicants who live in the smaller geographic zone around a particular school (rather than the larger district’s middle school zone).

BOROUGHWIDE PROGRAMS

Eligibility: Open to students and residents of the borough

These programs are open to students who live and/or go to school in the same borough as the school. Example: If your child lives in Queens, they are eligible to apply to boroughwide programs located in Queens.

CITYWIDE PROGRAMS

Eligibility: Open to all New York City residents

These programs are open to all students who live in New York City.

MARK TWAIN TALENT TEST

Mark Twain for the Gifted and Talented (I.S. 239) is a citywide school that requires applicants to participate in talent testing.

If you’re interested in applying, register your child to take tests in two talent areas. During the application period, you can register one of three ways:

  • Online with MySchools - select the Mark Twain tab
  • Through your child's school counselor
  • At a Family Welcome Center

Students taking the talent test will be given appointments in early January.

Learn How Students Get Offers

How can you know your chances of getting an offer to a specific program? And how do you increase your chances of getting an offer to a program on your application? It helps to start by learning how offers are made. Students get offers to programs based on some or all of the following factors. You can control some of these factors, while others are aspects of the programs themselves.

Learning about all of these factors can help you know your chances of getting an offer to each program of interest:

  1. Your Application Choices. The number of program choices you add to your child’s application and the order in which you place them matter! This is a factor you can control. Add up to 12 choices to your child’s application in your true order of preference. Then submit your application.
  2. Seat Availability. Each program has certain number of available seats.
  3. Admissions Priorities. Some programs give admissions priority to specific groups of applicants before others, such as to students who live in a specific zone or district. All students in a program's priority group 1 will be considered first. Then, if seats are still available, students in that program's priority group 2 will be considered next, and so on. Learn which priority group your child is in for each program. They will be in different priority groups for different programs.
  4. Admissions Methods. For some programs, applicants get offers based on random selection. For other programs, applicants are evaluated based on selection criteria and then ranked based on that evaluation.

Your Application Choices

The most important factor in determining where your child goes to middle school is how you complete their middle school application. When you are logged in to MySchools, you will see as options all the middle school programs that your child is eligible to add to their application.

  1. From these options, choose up to 12 programs that your child would like to attend. Add these programs to your child's application. Adding more choices increases your chances of getting an offer to one of those choices; it does NOT lower your chance of getting an offer to any of your top choice programs. You have the same chance of getting an offer from your top choice whether you include only that choice or eleven additional choices below it.
  2. Be sure to place these programs on the application in your true order of preference, with your child's first-choice program at the top as #1, their second-choice program as #2, and so on. This order matters! Your child will be considered for their first-choice program first. If they don't get an offer to their first choice, then they will be considered for their second-choice program as though it were their first choice, and so on. They will get an offer from their highest possible choice considering the other factors discussed in this section.

It's also a good idea not to apply to only programs that use screened or composite score admissions methods. Listing only these programs lowers your chance of receiving an offer to a program of your choice.

Tip: Submitting a middle school application is your best opportunity to get an offer to a school you prefer, so be sure to make thoughtful choices! Place the programs on your application in your true order of preference. Middle schools will not see this order, so they will not know if they are your first or twelfth choice.

Seat Availability

SEATS AND APPLICANTS PER SEAT - DEMAND LAST YEAR

Each middle school has a specific number of seats for sixth grade students. You can find out how many students a program accepted last year (Seats) and how many total students applied for those sears (Applicants) in Demand Last Year section of MySchools. You can learn how in-demand, or popular, a program was by how many people applied for each available seat (Applicants Per Seat - a higher number of applicants per seat means higher demand.

GENERAL EDUCATION AND STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

Each program admits general education students and students with disabilities. Your middle school application will show your designation. This is not something you are able to choose or edit.

General Education StudentsStudents with Disabilities
  • For students who do not have IEPs
  • For students with IEPs recommending related services only
  • For students with IEPs recommending special education instructional programming for 20% or less of their academic program as indicated on their current IEP
  • For students who are recommended for special education instructional programming for more than 20% of their academic program as indicated on their current IEP

Special education instructional programming includes Integrated Co-Teaching (ICT) classes, Special Class (SC), and Special Education Teacher Support Services (SETSS). Adapted Physical Education (APE) and related services, such as speech, occupational therapy (OT), and physical therapy (PT), are not considered special education instructional programming for the purposes of middle school admissions.

Please note that students with 504 plans are not entitled to seats for students with disabilities if they do not have an IEP recommending the student also receive special education instructional programming for more than 20% of their academic program.

Every middle school program participating in middle school admissions is expected to welcome and serve students with disabilities in accordance with the recommended programs and services on their Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). The School Implementation Team (SIT) at the middle school will review the IEP to ensure that all services and supports a student is recommended for are provided. In some cases, the IEP team may meet to review the IEP to better meet the student's current needs.

Admissions Priorities

A program’s admissions priorities determine the order in which applicants are considered for offers to each program. If a program has multiple admissions priorities, students are considered in groups.

  • All students in priority group 1 will be considered first.
  • Then, if seats are still available, students in priority group 2 will be considered next, and so on.

Tip: Consider applying to programs where your child is in priority group 1. Your child will have a better chance of getting an offer to these programs than students in other priority groups. Schools with more than one middle school program may have different admissions priorities for each program.

Admissions Priority What It Means
Priority to continuing 5th gradersStudents who currently attend a school that continues to eighth or twelfth grade are guaranteed to offer to continue attending a program at that school if they add it to their middle school application. Students will first be considered for any programs that they placed higher in their applications. You do NOT need to place your child's continuing school as your first choice program to be guaranteed an offer there, but you do have to add it as one of your choices.
Priority to students and residents of the districtStudents may have priority based on the district, borough, or geographic area where they live and/or go to public school. If a student lives and goes to public school in different boroughs or districts, that student has priority in both places.
Priority to residents of the zoneStudents who are zoned to a middle school - or a school campus containing multiple middle schools - have priority to attend the zoned program(s) to your child's middle school application. You do NOT need to rank your zoned school's program as your first choice to get the priority. To find out if you have a zoned school or schools, check MySchools or enter your address at schools.nyc.gov/Find-a-School.
Priority to applicants eligible for free and reduced lunch (FRL) for up to 50% of seats.This is one example of a diversity-in-admissions priority. In this sample priority, applicants whose families meet a specific income requirement have priority to 50% of seats in this program.

DIVERSITY IN ADMISSIONS

Some programs have admissions priorities based on family income, ELL status, or other criteria. Middle schools across the city are participating in an effort to increase diversity in their programs. The current list of schools participating in diversity pilots is available on our Diversity in Admissions website.

Admissions Methods

Admissions methods are the ways programs make offers to students. They also describe what you need to do to be considered for a program. In most cases, all you have to do is list the program on your application.

There are broader types of admissions methods—those that use random selection and those that use ranking to admit applicants:

PROGRAMS THAT USE RANDOM SELECTION

As part of the middle school admissions process, every applicant is assigned a random number, as in a lottery. Programs with an open admissions method use students’ randomly assigned numbers, and may also use admissions priorities, to make offers. When a program has more applicants than seats, students are admitted in order by their randomly assigned numbers. If the program also uses admissions priorities, all applicants from the first priority group for a program are admitted before any students from the second priority, regardless of their randomly assigned numbers. There are two types of admissions methods that use random selection: open and limited unscreened.

PROGRAMS THAT USE RANKING

Students are given offers to these programs based on their previous year’s academic record. These programs use either a screened, screened: language, or composite score admissions method.

  • At a screened and screened: language programs, middle school staff evaluate the applicant pool based on their admissions rubric. Some schools may invite students to participate in testing or an interview. Schools then numerically rank applicants, and offers are given to students in descending order of rank.
  • At composite score programs, applicants get an automatically calculated composite score that reflects their previous year’s academic record. The higher the student’s performance, the higher their composite score will be. Offers are then given to applicants in descending order of composite score. A program’s selection criteria may include final fourth grade report card grades, standardized test scores, internal assessments, and/or attendance and punctuality to evaluate and rank students.

Middle School Admissions Method

MethodsWhat You Need to DoWhat Schools See
OpenJust add this program to your child's application.
  • Biographical information: Your child’s name, home address, current school, gender, and special education status
Limited Unscreened
  • Demonstrate your child’s interest in this school by signing in at an event.
  • Add the program to your child’s application.
  • Biographical information
  • For limited unscreened programs: Schools will give priotiy to applicants who demonstrate interest
Zoned or Continuing
  • Learn if you have a zoned or continuing school: Visit schools.nyc.gov/Find-a-School and enter your home address.
  • Add the program to your child’s application.
  • Biographical information
  • For zoned or continuing programs: Students in the school’s zone have either a guarantee or priority to attend
Screened
  • Complete any additional requirements listed in MySchools.
  • Check this program’s selection criteria to see what the school uses in admissions.
  • Contact the school directly to learn how specific programs rank applicants.
  • Discuss with a school counselor how competitive your child’s grades and scores are.
  • Add the program to your child’s application.
  • Biographical information
  • Academic record: Schools evaluate applicants based on selection criteria that may include final report card grades from fourth grade, standardized test scores, internal assessments, and/or attendance and punctuality. Then they rank students based on that evaluation. Offers are made to ranked students by priority group and in ranking number order.
Screened: Language
  • Check that you meet the program’s selection criteria, such as home language, language proficiency, years living in the United States, or similar.
  • Add the program to your child’s application.
  • Biographical information
  • Academic record
  • ELL services entitlement: Schools evaluate applicants based on selection criteria. Then they rank students based on that evaluation. Offers are made to ranked students by priority group and in ranking number order.
Composite Score
  • Check this program’s selection criteria on its school page to see what the school uses to assign composite scores. Also note how different programs weigh different selection criteria.
  • Discuss with a school counselor how competitive your child’s grades and scores are.
  • Add the program to your child’s application.
  • Academic record: Student’s composite scores are calculated by assigning points for corresponding components of their academic records, which may include: Final fourth grade report card, New York State ELA Exam score, New York State Math Exam score, attendance, and/or punctuality. Students are then ranked by these scores. Offers are made to students in descending score order.
Talent Test (for Mark Twain for the Gifted and Talented)
  • Register your child for the talent tests. You can register online with MySchools - click on the Mark Twain tab - or through a school counselor.
  • Add the programs to your child’s application.
  • Your child takes the talent tests.
  • Talent test scores only: Offers are made to students in talent test score order. Other criteria are not seen or used in admissions.

Selection Criteria

Programs that have a screened, screened: language, or composite score admissions methods use specific selection criteria to make offers.

  • For screened or screened language programs: These programs’ selection criteria tells you which information their school uses to rank applicants.
  • For composite score programs: These programs’ selection criteria tells you which information is used to create each applicant’s composite score.

The selection criteria for programs with screened or composite score admissions methods will tell you which of the following are used when ranking and scoring applicants:

  • Final fourth grade report card
  • Fourth grade New York State ELA and Math scores
  • Attendance and punctuality from fourth grade
  • Academic and personal behaviors, which are:
    • Manages time and consistently demonstrates effort to independently achieve goals
    • Works in an organized manner
    • Persists through challenges to complete a task by trying different strategies
    • Asks for help when needed
    • Respects school rules and works well in the school community

Middle school admissions uses information from fourth grade to evaluate students for admissions. School staff should not ask families to provide extra information in the form of report cards from additional years or separate recommendations from teachers. Academic and personal behaviors are usually included as part of the fourth-grade report card. However, if your child’s school does not include them in report cards, ask school staff to provide this information.

Testing Accommodations

If a student’s IEP shows testing accommodations, the accommodations (as long as the accommodations do not change the skills or content the test is measuring) will be provided when the student tests or auditions. If you are invited to participate in a test or audition, please be sure to work with your child’s elementary school to communicate your child’s needs and required supports and share documentation with the middle school as needed. Learn more on our Testing Accommodations page.

Go to Events and Visit Schools

Most of the middle school admissions process happens in the fall, between September and December. In your calendar, note dates and times of middle school fairs, open houses, school tours, and appointments for programs that require interviews, auditions, or on-site assessments.

Middle School Fairs

Attend a middle school fair this fall! At these events, you can meet with representatives from different schools on the same day, in the same place. The middle school fairs for different districts will take place on different dates this fall. The latest information on dates, times, and locations is available on our website.

School Visits

Visiting a school is the best way to explore if it would be a good place for your child. It’s also a helpful way to test the commute and see how long the trip is from home. Contact school’s directly to find out if they have special events or open house listings. Visit our website to find specific school’s open house or information session dates.

Tip: When visiting schools, always ask questions. On sign-in sheets, write your contact information clearly to show interest, and so schools can follow up with your family about events and other information This is especially important for programs that use a limited unscreened admissions method.

Ask Questions at Middle School Events

When you speak with school representatives at a middle school fair or open house, be sure to ask questions. Below are some questions that can help you and your child learn more about schools of interest.

School Culture

  • How can my child get extra help with homework?
  • What makes your school special?
  • Do students at your school feel safe?

Sixth Grade

  • What time does the day start and end for sixth grade students?
  • Are there activities just for students in sixth grade? If so, what are they?

Academics

  • What are your most popular courses?
  • What makes your school’s courses different from those at other schools?
  • Does your school offer any accelerated courses that can count toward high school credit and Regents exam requirements?
  • What is your school’s teaching philosophy and approach?
  • What is your schoolwide grading policy?
  • How big are class sizes at your school?

Activities

  • What are some examples of clubs at your school?
  • When during a school day can students participate in activities?
  • Do you have any partnerships with outside organizations?

Admissions

  • To apply to this school, do we need to do anything besides adding it to the application? If so, what and by when?

Apply to Middle School

Apply to middle school by Monday, December 2, 2019. For the most up-to-date information on how to apply, visit our website.

HOW TO APPLY – CURRENT NYC PUBLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS

When your child’s personalized middle school application is available in October, your child’s current school will provide you with clear instructions on how to access it. You can then apply online with MySchools or through your child’s school counselor. Here’s how to apply:

  1. Discuss middle school options with your child. Save or list programs of interest.
  2. Make an appointment with your child’s current school counselor to talk about and review your application choices before applying.
  3. Apply to middle school by the December 2 deadline. You can apply one of two ways:
  • Online with MySchools

During the application period, this option will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in Arabic, Bengali/Bangla, Chinese, English, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Urdu. Don’t forget to click the Submit Application button!

  • Through your child’s current school counselor

Speak to a school counselor this fall about submitting your middle school application through the school.

HOW TO APPLY – PRIVATE OR PAROCHIAL SCHOOL STUDENTS

If your child currently attends a private or parochial school and would like to apply to public school, our Family Welcome Center staff will walk you through the process! Here’s how to apply:

  1. Discuss middle school options with your child. Save or list programs of interest.
  2. Visit a Family Welcome Center with your child to explore your child’s application choices. Find locations and hours at schools.nyc.gov/WelcomeCenters.
  3. Apply to middle school by the December 2 deadline. You can apply one of two ways:
  • Online with MySchools

During the application period, this option will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, in Arabic, Bengali/Bangla, Chinese, English, French, Haitian Creole, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Urdu. Don’t forget to click the Submit Application button!

  • Through a Family Welcome Center

Family Welcome Center staff are available to help you submit your child’s application. You can apply in person in over 200 languages. If you speak a language other than English, ask for an interpreter.

New to NYC public school? Year-round, visit the New Student’s page at schools.nyc.gov/NewStudents to learn how to enroll, where to go, and what to bring.

Get Your Middle School Offer

OFFER LETTERS

In March, you’ll receive your child’s middle school offer letter. This letter will include an offer to a DOE public middle school for the 2020-2021 school year.

WAITLIST OFFER

Middle school programs that have more applicants than seats available will have waitlists.

You'll be able to get on waitlists in two ways:

  1. Through the middle school application: You will be automatically added to the waitlist for any program that you listed higher on your application than the program to which you received an offer.
  2. Post-application: You can add yourself to waitlists for schools that you did not apply to but are now interested in.

Students will have a unique placement on each waitlist based on a school’s admissions method and priority structure:

  • For schools that have open admissions, students will be ordered randomly within their priority group (e.g. zoned priority; district priority).
  • For schools that rank students based on a screen or audition, students will be ordered based on their rank within their priority group.

Your position may shift on waitlists as other students are called off or added to waitlists.

  • You will be able to learn of your position on each waitlist you are on through MySchools, Family Welcome Centers and your current school.
  • There is no limit to how many waitlists you can be on.
  • Waitlists will expire in September 2020.

SCHOOL LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION

We offer transportation to middle school students based on these criteria:

  • Students in sixth grade are provided with yellow bus service or a MetroCard if they live one mile or more from the school; if they live closer than that but more than one half mile from the school, a half-fare MTA bus pass is available on request from their school. Students may receive yellow busing on if they live in the same district as their school and if the school utilizes yellow bus transportation.
  • Students in seventh grade and above are provided with MetroCards if they live one and a half miles or more from school. If they live closer than that but more than one half mile from school, a half-fare MTA bus pass is available on request from their school.
  • Students whose IEP requires specialized transportation services are placed on bus routes to and from the school they attend. In addition, parents may request additional medical accommodations based on their child’s special needs which may also affect the type of vehicle or route on which the student is placed.

For more information on transportation, call us at 718-392-8855, or visit our website.

Cover of the print 2020 NYC High School Admissions Guide, featuring three high school students gazing at the city from the terrace or roof of a building.
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