Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)

The NYC Department of Health is currently investigating cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children, or MIS-C (previously known as PMIS), a health condition appearing in children in New York City and elsewhere. The NYC Department of Health’s Fact Sheet (Open external link) conveys new information about the syndrome, its symptoms, when to seek medical help, treatments, and preventative steps. Because MIS-C is associated with COVID-19, reducing your child’s risk of exposure to COVID-19 continues to be essential.

MIS-C is a rare condition that is not contagious. However, because it is life-threatening, it is important to know the signs. Most children have a persistent, high fever lasting several days, along with other symptoms, including:

  • Irritability or sluggishness
  • Abdominal pain without another explanation
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Rash
  • Conjunctivitis, or red or pink eyes
  • Enlarged lymph node (“gland”) on one side of the neck
  • Red, cracked lips or red tongue that looks like a strawberry
  • Swollen hands and feet, which might also be red

You should call your doctor if your child becomes ill and has had continued fever. Your doctor will ask about your child’s symptoms and use that information to recommend next steps. If your child is severely ill, you should go to the nearest emergency room or call 911 immediately.

Parents should help their children understand the importance of the following measures and ensure their children follow them:

  • Wearing a face covering when outside the home
  • Continuing to practice good hygiene, such as frequently washing hands
  • Maintaining at least 6 feet of distance from others as much as possible when outside the home

The health and safety of our communities remain our top priority, and we will continue to follow all guidance and take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Contact 311 with any questions.

For translated messages about MIS-C for families see the InfoHub page.

Letters to Families From the Chancellor

June 5, 2020

The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority, and we will continue to take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Recently, we shared some information with you regarding Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). Although we do not have any new updates to report, guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will also find the MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week and translated into multiple languages.

As a reminder for the health of all children in New York City, all children over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others. Free face coverings are available at DOE Meal Hubs in all five boroughs. Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering. When outside the home, adults and children should maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible.

We will continue to communicate with you on a weekly basis regarding MIS-C and provide updates, if any. Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and please contact 311 with any questions.

May 29, 2020

The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority, and we will continue to take all appropriate measures to help keep our students, families, and staff members safe. Two weeks ago, we shared some information with you regarding the Pediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (PMIS), a rare condition that is potentially life-threatening in children. Last week, we learned from DOHMH that the condition was renamed Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). Guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will also find the MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week and newly translated into multiple languages here. 

As a gentle reminder, families should continue to discuss with their children the importance of the following measures and ensure your children are doing the following:

  • Consistent with Executive Order 202.17: all people over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their home if they cannot maintain physical distance from others. Free face coverings are available at DOE Meal Hubs in all five boroughs .
  • Physical distancing and good hygiene remain critical, even while wearing a face covering.
  • When outside the home, adults and children must maintain at least 6 feet of distance between themselves and others whenever possible.
  • Parents should remind children of the importance of good hand hygiene and should help ensure that children frequently wash their hands.

    We will continue to communicate with you on a weekly basis regarding MIS-C. Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and do not hesitate to contact 311 with any questions

Letters to REC Families from the Chancellor and Commissioner of Health

June 5, 2020

The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) and the New York City Department of Education (DOE) continue to collaborate on keeping students, families and staff members safe, healthy, and informed as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic evolves. The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority and we will continue to provide guidance and take all appropriate measures to keep our students, families, and staff members safe.

At present, we do not have any new updates to report since our last letter dated May 29, 2020. However, guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to continue to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will find the DOHMH MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week which is also available in multiple languages here.

We will continue to take precautions to prevent your child from being exposed to COVID-19 while attending a REC site. As a reminder, please be advised all children over the age of two who can medically tolerate a face covering must wear one when they are outside their homeChildren and all staff are required to use a face covering at all times while they are on-site at RECs. Students and staff will continue to practice good hand hygiene and physical distancing. Staff will continue to teach and reinforce these habits to all in attendance.

Children with chronic medical conditions can be at higher risk for poor outcomes of COVID-19 and should take special care to adhere to prevention measures. If your child becomes ill with a continued fever, please call your doctor. Please make sure you document all of your child’s symptoms since your doctor will use the information to recommend next steps. If your child is severely ill, please visit the nearest emergency room or call 911 immediately.

Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on COVID-19 and MIS-C, and contact 311 with any questions. Please contact your REC site supervisor with any questions or concerns.

May 29, 2020

Thank you for allowing us to continue to provide resources for your child at our Regional Enrichment Centers (REC). The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) and the Department of Education (DOE) continue to collaborate on keeping students, families and staff members safe, healthy, and informed as the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic evolves. The health and safety of our communities remains our top priority and we will continue to provide guidance and take all appropriate measures to keep our students, families, and staff members safe.

Two weeks ago, we shared some information with you regarding the Pediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (PMIS), a rare condition that is potentially life-threatening in children. Last week, we learned from DOHMH that the condition was renamed Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). Guidance issued by DOHMH remains in place, and we urge you to visit nyc.gov/health at any time for this important information related to MIS-C. There, you will also find the MIS-C Fact Sheet, provided last week and newly translated into multiple languages .

Although MIS-C is a rare condition and not contagious, it is potentially life-threatening. It is important to know the signs and symptoms of MIS-C, which include persistent and high temperature lasting several days as well as:

  • Irritability or sluggishness
  • Abdominal pain without another explanation
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Rash
  • Conjunctivitis, or red or pink eyes
  • Enlarged lymph node (“gland”) on one side of the neck
  • Red, cracked lips or red tongue that looks like a strawberry
  • Swollen hands and feet, which might also be red

We will continue to take precautions to prevent your child from being exposed to COVID-19 while attending a REC site. Your REC site will continue to provide face coverings which is for each child in attendance, and all children will continue to be required to wear face coverings while in attendance. Students and staff will continue to practice good hand hygiene and physical distancing. Staff will continue to teach and reinforce these habits to all in attendance.

Children with chronic medical conditions can be at higher risk for poor outcomes of COVID-19 and should take special care to adhere to prevention measures. If your child becomes ill with a continued fever, please call your doctor. Please make sure you document all of your child’s symptoms since your doctor will use the information to recommend next steps. If your child is severely ill, please visit the nearest emergency room or call 911 immediately.

Please visit nyc.gov/health at any time for the latest information on MIS-C, and contact 311 with any questions. Please contact your REC site supervisor with any questions or concerns.

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