Prepare for Remote Learning

In the event that public school buildings must close due to an emergency, students will participate in remote learning at home. Make sure your family is ready by visiting our Digital Learning webpage for helpful resources and information. You can also find answers to frequently asked questions below:

Frequently Asked Questions about Remote Learning

How will I know if school buildings are closed?

Your school will stay in close communication with you regarding weather events or other emergencies that may require public school buildings to close. To make sure we can reach you, be sure to update your contact information in your NYC Schools Account (NYCSA) online at schoolsaccount.nyc, or complete the emergency contact form provided by your school. Learn more about how to sign up for NYCSA at schools.nyc.gov/nycsa.

Which students are expected to participate in remote learning?

Students in kindergarten or above will be expected to log on and participate in their classes from home. Children attending LYFE or a 3K or Pre-K program in an elementary school or Pre-K Center should participate in the remote learning experiences outlined by their program.

What will my student need to participate in remote learning?

Students can access all the New York City Public Schools (NYCPS) technology platforms they will need for remote learning through their NYCPS account, which is created automatically when your child enrolls in school.

You can access your child’s NYCPS account by signing into TeachHub (teachhub.schools.nyc) using the username and password that your school provided. If you are not sure of your child’s username and password, please visit selfservice.schools.nyc or ask your school for help. From there, students and families can connect to all NYCPS applications with one click. Check our Applications and Platforms webpage to learn more about what your student will need to participate.

Learn more about NYCPS accounts at schools.nyc.gov/studentaccounts.

How can I request an internet-enabled device for my student, if we don’t have access to one at home?

To participate in remote learning, students will need access to a computer, laptop, or iPad that can connect to the internet. If your child does not have an internet-ready device at home, you can request a NYCPS-loaned device from your school. If your child needs a NYCPS device, please ask your school now, to ensure you are prepared; do not wait for a building closure. You can find guidance on how to get started using your loaned iPad or laptop at schools.nyc.gov/NYCPSdevices.

Find additional information on free and low cost internet for eligible students and families on our website! 

Who can help me if I am having technology trouble?

Families can get help with school accounts, software, and devices on the NYC Public Schools technology  SupportHub


In celebration of Pride Month, we’re sharing the story of Edie Windsor, a computer programmer and pioneering LGBTQ+ activist best known for her role in the landmark 2013 Supreme Court case, United States v. Windsor, that helped lead towards the eventual legalization of gay marriage in the United States.

Learn about Edie Windsor on Hidden Voices

Thea Spyer (left) sitting with her arm around Edie Windsor (right) outside on some rocks with bare trees in the background.

June is Caribbean American Heritage Month! To celebrate, we're sharing the story of Antonia Pantoja, a Puerto Rican activist and educator known for fighting for the rights of her community, especially in New York City.

Learn more about Antonia Pantoja on Hidden Voices

Black and white photograph of Antonia Pantoja in a classroom. The background is tinted green.

June is Pride Month! This year, New York City is also marking the 55th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising on June 28, 2024. To help you learn and celebrate this month, we’re sharing some of our favorite books that feature LGBTQ+ individuals at the forefront. With a collection of both fiction and non-fiction stories across cultures, settings, and time periods, we hope you'll enjoy these books as much as we do! 

Early Readers (3K–Grade 2)

  • Drawing on Walls: A Story of Keith Haring, by Matthew Burgess; illustrated by Josh Cochran  
  • Kind Like Marsha: Learning from LGBTQ+ Leaders, by Sarah Prager; illustrated by Cheryl Thuesday  
  • Phoenix Gets Greater, by Marty Wilson-Trudeau with Phoenix Wilson; illustrated by Megan Kyak-Monteith
  • Ritu Weds Chandni, by Ameya Narvankar
  • A Song for the Unsung: Bayard Rustin, The Man Behind the 1963 March on Washington, by Carole Boston Weatherford and Rob Sanders; illustrated by Byron McCray

Elementary (Grades 3–5) 

  • Answers in the Pages, by David Levithan
  • A High Five for Glenn Burke, by Phil Bildner
  • Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World, by Ashley Herring Blake
  • This is Our Rainbow: 16 Stories of Her, Him, Them, and Us, edited by Katherine Locke and Nicole Melleby
  • Twelfth, by Janet Key

Middle School (Grades 6–8)

  • Alice Austen Lived Here, by Alex Gino
  • In the Key of Us, by Mariama J. Lockington
  • The Insiders, by Mark Oshiro
  • Nikhil Out Loud, by Maulik Pancholy
  • A Queer History of the United States for Young People, by Michael Bronski; adapted by Richie Chevat  

Upper Grades (Grades 9–12)

  • All Boys Aren’t Blue, by George M. Johnson
  • Felix Ever After, by Kacen Callender
  • Last Night at the Telegraph Club, by Malinda Lo
  • Songs of Irie, by Asha Ashanti Bromfield
  • Stonewall: Breaking Out in the Fight for Gay Rights, by Ann Bausum 
Image of two students reading.

You can check out our full Pride Month Reading List on our website for even more great recommendations! These books, and many others, can be found on Sora, our Citywide Digital Library, which provides free access to thousands of digital e-books and audiobooks for our students! During Pride Month, you can also check out these collections on Sora for more recommendations:


Missed our previous books of the week?

Check out all of our past recommendations in the Books of the Week Archive!


SPOTLIGHT ON OUR SCHOOLS

As we start to wrap up the 2023–24 school year, we're taking a look back at some of this year's outstanding Prom Looks!  Check out the following photos to see how the Class of 2024 showed up and SHOWED OUT during prom season!

1 / 8
2 / 8
3 / 8
4 / 8
5 / 8
6 / 8
7 / 8
8 / 8

A young man and woman dressed in formal attire and taking a selfie.
Three high school seniors, two young men and one young woman, standing in a row and smiling while wearing formal outfits. One student is wearing a masquerade mask.
Two prom couples, posing around a garden bench. Two young men are flanking two seated young women.
Two young men playing chess while in the middle of a formal gathering inside of a boat.
Two young men dressed in formal attire featuring dark velvets and lavenders.
Three students standing outside the entrance to a hotel ballroom with formal attire on.
Four young women in formal prom attire sitting down on gold-rimmed stairway.
Group photo featuring students dressed in formal outfits at a prom

Six men, the Emancipation Day Band, in the year 1900. They are carry instruments, wearing suits and hats, and in front of an American flag.

Celebrating Pride Month graphic with rainbow illustrations.

Celebrating Caribbean American Heritage Month graphic with floral illustrations in bright colors.

Prepare for Remote Learning

In the event that public school buildings must close due to an emergency, students will participate in remote learning at home. Make sure your family is ready by visiting our Digital Learning webpage for helpful resources and information. You can also find answers to frequently asked questions below:

Frequently Asked Questions about Remote Learning

How will I know if school buildings are closed?

Your school will stay in close communication with you regarding weather events or other emergencies that may require public school buildings to close. To make sure we can reach you, be sure to update your contact information in your NYC Schools Account (NYCSA) online at schoolsaccount.nyc, or complete the emergency contact form provided by your school. Learn more about how to sign up for NYCSA at schools.nyc.gov/nycsa.

Which students are expected to participate in remote learning?

Students in kindergarten or above will be expected to log on and participate in their classes from home. Children attending LYFE or a 3K or Pre-K program in an elementary school or Pre-K Center should participate in the remote learning experiences outlined by their program.

What will my student need to participate in remote learning?

Students can access all the New York City Public Schools (NYCPS) technology platforms they will need for remote learning through their NYCPS account, which is created automatically when your child enrolls in school.

You can access your child’s NYCPS account by signing into TeachHub (teachhub.schools.nyc) using the username and password that your school provided. If you are not sure of your child’s username and password, please visit selfservice.schools.nyc or ask your school for help. From there, students and families can connect to all NYCPS applications with one click. Check our Applications and Platforms webpage to learn more about what your student will need to participate.

Learn more about NYCPS accounts at schools.nyc.gov/studentaccounts.

How can I request an internet-enabled device for my student, if we don’t have access to one at home?

To participate in remote learning, students will need access to a computer, laptop, or iPad that can connect to the internet. If your child does not have an internet-ready device at home, you can request a NYCPS-loaned device from your school. If your child needs a NYCPS device, please ask your school now, to ensure you are prepared; do not wait for a building closure. You can find guidance on how to get started using your loaned iPad or laptop at schools.nyc.gov/NYCPSdevices.

Find additional information on free and low cost internet for eligible students and families on our website! 

Who can help me if I am having technology trouble?

Families can get help with school accounts, software, and devices on the NYC Public Schools technology  SupportHub

Related Links