Chancellor Fariña Announces 346 High Schools Participating in Career Exploration Month

  • Posted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 Updated: Tue Apr 24, 2018

Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña today announced that 346 high schools are participating in Career Exploration Month this February, a citywide effort to help students identify career interests and learn about the postsecondary paths needed to pursue those careers. This is the second year of Career Exploration Month; last year, 253 high schools participated.

NEW YORK - Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña today announced that 346 high schools are participating in Career Exploration Month this February, a citywide effort to help students identify career interests and learn about the postsecondary paths needed to pursue those careers. This is the second year of Career Exploration Month; last year, 253 high schools participated. 

The expanded Career Exploration Month aligns to the City's College Access for All initiative as well the nationally celebrated Career and Technical Education (CTE) Month. The City has invested in CTE high schools by opening 40 new high-quality CTE programs and strengthening and expanding work-based learning, including providing 3,000 new internships annually by 2019 through the new CTE Industry Scholars program. 

"Career Exploration Month is about our long-term commitment to preparing our students to reach their potential once they graduate," said Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña. "It provides exciting, hands-on opportunities for students to think about their future and how they'll take what they've learned in the classroom to improve our City and our society. This is deeply personal to me, as I only went on to college and a career as an educator because of teachers who took an interest in me and my path to success." 

Individual schools are hosting a variety of activities to promote career awareness and exploration, including career presentations and fairs; resume writing and interviewing workshops; presentations led by alumni, industry partners, and community-based organizations; and visits to businesses across New York City. The Chancellor made the announcement at Queens Vocational and Technical High School, a CTE high school which is hosting career presentations, resume writing and interviewing workshops, and a mentoring program for young women in CTE this month. 

The DOE is hosting events including a Career Readiness 101 workshop for 600 students who will begin CTE Industry Scholars internships later this month; a Summer Enrichment Program Fair, where high school students and families can learn about summer employment opportunities and participate in career skills and planning workshops; and a "February Fashion" Career Day where fashion students from three high schools participate in a Career Day and tour businesses in the Garment District in Manhattan. The DOE is also hosting a "Career Fundamentals Training" for school counselors, and provided all New York City high schools with a toolkit of resources they can use for Career Exploration Month and throughout the school year. 

"I'm pleased more than 80 high schools across Brooklyn are participating in Career Exploration Month," said Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. "We best cultivate the next generation of leaders when we provide our young people with dynamic learning opportunities that equip them with the best tools available to tackle life's challenges and opportunities."
“CTE programs don’t just play a pivotal role in dropout prevention and increasing student engagement. These programs can also provide a pipeline to careers and colleges,” said Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. “The Career Exploration Month workshops will help students make critical connections between their studies and their future professions.”
"Chancellor Fariña has generated an extraordinary level of participation in this year's Career Exploration Month," said Congressman Joe Crowley, Chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. "This citywide effort allows students to directly access programming and workshops to help them cultivate the skills needed to thrive and ensures that our public education system is preparing our children to lead America into the future." 

"Congratulations to Queens Vocational High School and the many other schools that are participating in Career Exploration Month," said Assemblywoman Catherine Nolan. "I would like to commend Chancellor Fariña and Mayor de Blasio for their commitment to invest in career and technical education. My father graduated from Queens Vocational HS many years ago and had a great career in both the US Air Force and the phone company. It's so important we provide young people today with good career paths." 

"Career Exploration Month gives our city's students valuable opportunities to familiarize themselves with the postsecondary world, connect with experienced professionals from a wide variety of fields, and find the calling that they can one day call a career," said City Council Education Committee Chair Mark Treyger. "When we provide more ways for young people to get a head start on being part of the 21st century workforce, they benefit greatly, and so does our city."

Through College Access for All, every middle school student will have the opportunity to visit a college campus by 2018, every high school student will have the resources and support at their school to graduate with an individual college and career plan by 2019, and every high school junior will be able to take the SAT free of charge during the school day starting this year.

Together, the Equity and Excellence for All initiatives are building a pathway to success in college and careers for all students. Our schools are starting earlier - free, full-day, high-quality education for three-year-olds and four-year-olds through 3-K for All and Pre-K for All. They are strengthening foundational skills and instruction earlier - Universal Literacy so that every student is reading on grade level by the end of 2nd grade; and Algebra for All to improve elementary- and middle-school math instruction and ensure that all 8th graders have access to algebra. They are offering students more challenging, hands-on, college and career-aligned coursework - Computer Science for All brings 21st-century computer science instruction to every school, and AP for All will give all high school students access to at least five Advanced Placement courses. Along the way, they are giving students and families additional support through College Access for All, Single Shepherd, and investment in Community Schools. Efforts to create more diverse and inclusive classrooms through Diversity in New York City Public Schools, the City's school diversity plan, are central to this pathway. 

More information on Career Exploration Month is available online
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